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Green mesenchymal IPS stem cells.

Expand Your Cell-based Assays With an Unlimited, Biologically Relevant Resource

Jul 22, 2021 at 12:00 PM ET

Abstract

Toxicology and cancer researchers alike are challenged by the lack of a consistent source of cells with high physiological relevance for their cell-based assays. The source tissue for primary cells comes from a variety of donors, which can introduce interexperimental variability and confound experimental results. Differentiated induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cells fulfill the need for a consistent source of cells and physiological relevance. iPSCs are able to be generated in large cell numbers from a single clone, providing the needed consistency. Further, iPSCs can be differentiated into a variety of desired, functional cell types, affording the necessary biological relevance. Here we provide data demonstrating how differentiated iPSC-derived cells can be incorporated into immunoassays or further differentiated into cell types such as osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes.

Key Points

  • Differentiated iPSCs lend the ability to run large toxicity studies and drug screens on highly biologically relevant cells.
  • ATCC iPSCs were used as the source for three types of differentiated cells: CD34+ progenitors, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and monocytes.
  • ATCC R&D scientists have generated in-depth data showing the iPSC-derived cells can be incorporated into immunoassays and further differentiated into cell types such as osteocytes, chondrocytes, and adipocytes.

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Presenter

Brian Shapiro, headshot.

Brian Shapiro, PhD

Scientific Content Specialist, ATCC

 Brian A Shapiro, Ph.D., works to communicate the scientific breakthroughs of ATCC’s product development laboratories to the biomedical research community. Previously, he worked at Virginia Commonwealth University, where he investigated the role of pre-mRNA splicing in the multi-drug resistance of lung cancer. Dr. Shapiro attended the Medical College of Georgia, where his research focused on adrenal physiology as well as diseases of the epidermis.