U-87 MG (ATCC® HTB-14)

Organism: Homo sapiens, human  /  Tissue: brain  /  Disease: Likely glioblastoma

Organism Homo sapiens, human
Tissue brain
Product Format frozen
Morphology epithelial
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1

Biosafety classification is based on U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines, it is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country.

Disease Likely glioblastoma
Age unknown
Gender male
Ethnicity unknown
Applications
This cell line is a suitable transfection host.
Storage Conditions liquid nitrogen vapor phase
Karyotype This is a hypodiploid human cell line with the modal chromosome number of 44 occurring in 48% of cells. The rate of higher ploidy was 5.9%., Twelve markers were common to all cells, including der(1)t(1;3) (p22;q21), der(16)t(1;16) (p22;p12), del(9) (p13) and nine others. The marker der(1) had two copies in most cells. There was only one copy of normal X. N1, N6 and N9 were not found.
Images
Derivation This is one of a number of cell lines derived from malignant gliomas (see also ATCC® HTB-15™ and HTB-16™) by J. Ponten and associates from 1966 to 1969 (see also Allen, 2016).
Clinical Data male
Tumorigenic Yes
Effects
Yes, in nude mice inoculated subcutaneously with 10(7) cells
Comments
Mycoplasma contamination was eliminated in September 1975.
The ATCC® HTB-14™ cell line was deposited at ATCC in 1982.
STR profiling, Y-chromosome paint, and Q-band assay confirmed that the cell line is male in origin. Based on current literature, the cell line is likely a glioblastoma of CNS origin (Allen, 2016).
Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, Catalog No. 30-2003. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum to a final concentration of 10%.
Subculturing Volumes used in this protocol are for 75 cmflasks; proportionally reduce or increase amount of dissociation medium for culture vessels of other sizes. Corning® T-75 flasks (catalog #430641) are recommended for subculturing this product.
  1. Remove and discard culture medium.
  2. Briefly rinse the cell layer with Ca++/Mg++ free Dulbecco's phosphate-buffered saline (D-PBS) or 0.25% (w/v) Trypsin - 0.53 mM EDTA solution to remove all traces of serum which contains trypsin inhibitor.
  3. Add 2.0 to 3.0 mL of Trypsin-EDTA solution to flask and observe cells under an inverted microscope until cell layer is dispersed (usually within 5 to 15 minutes).
    Note: To avoid clumping do not agitate the cells by hitting or shaking the flask while waiting for the cells to detach. Cells that are difficult to detach may be placed at 37°C to facilitate dispersal.
  4. Add 2.0 to 3.0 mL of complete growth medium and aspirate cells by gently pipetting
  5. Resuspend the cell pellet in fresh growth medium. Add appropriate aliquots of the cell suspension to new culture vessels.
  6. Incubate cultures at 37°C.
Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:2 to 1:5 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 2 to 3 times per week
Cryopreservation
Culture medium, 95%; DMSO, 5%
Culture Conditions
Atmosphere: 5% CO2 in air recommended
Temperature: 37°C
STR Profile
Amelogenin: X,Y
CSF1PO: 10,11
D13S317: 8,11
D7S820: 8,9
D5S818: 11,12
D16S539: 12
vWA: 15,17
THO1: 9.3
TPOX: 8
Isoenzymes
AK-1, 1
ES-D, 1
G6PD, B
GLO-I, 1
Me-2, 1
PGM1, 2
PGM3, 1
Name of Depositor J Ponten
Year of Deposit 1966
References

Allen M, et al. Origin of the U87MG glioma cell line: Good news and bad news. Sci. Trans. Med. 8(354): 1-4, 2016.

Clark MJ, et al. U87MG decoded: The genomic sequence of a cytogenetically aberrant human cancer cell line. PLoS Genetics 6 (1) : e1000832, 2010.

Li YM, et al. Molecular identity and cellular distribution of advanced glycation endproduct receptors: relationship of p60 to OST-48 and p90 to 80K-H membrane proteins. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 11047-11052, 1996. PubMed: 8855306

Olopade OI, et al. Molecular analysis of deletions of the short arm of chromosome 9 in human gliomas. Cancer Res. 52: 2523-2529, 1992. PubMed: 1568221

Fogh J, et al. Absence of HeLa cell contamination in 169 cell lines derived from human tumors. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 58: 209-214, 1977. PubMed: 833871

Goodfellow M, et al. One hundred and twenty-seven cultured human tumor cell lines producing tumors in nude mice. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 59: 221-226, 1977. PubMed: 77210034

Beckman G, et al. G-6-PD and PGM phenotypes of 16 continuous human tumor cell lines. Evidence against cross-contamination and contamination by HeLa cells. Hum. Hered. 21: 238-241, 1971. PubMed: 4332744

Ponten J, Macintyre EH. Long term culture of normal and neoplastic human glia. Acta Pathol. Microbiol. Scand. 74: 465-486, 1968. PubMed: 4313504

Tumors developed within 21 days at 100% frequency (5/5).

Cross References

Nucleotide (GenBank) : E02404 DNA encoding exon K of NAP.

Nucleotide (GenBank) : X06981 Human mRNA fragment for amyloid beta-protein (AP) insertion.

Nucleotide (GenBank) : E02405 DNA encoding PI(the active region that has protease inhibitor activity of NAP).

Nucleotide (GenBank) : E02400 DNA encoding NAP(new senile plaque amyloid precursor protein having protease inhibitor).

Nucleotide (GenBank) : E02402 DNA encoding exon I of NAp(new senile plaque amyloid precursor having protease inhibitor).

Nucleotide (GenBank) : E02401 DNA encoding exon H of NAp(new senile plaque amyloid precursor protein having protease inhibitor).

Nucleotide (GenBank) : E02403 DNA encoding exon J of NAP(new senile plaque amyloid precursor protein having protease inhibitor).

Basic Documentation
Other Documentation
References

Allen M, et al. Origin of the U87MG glioma cell line: Good news and bad news. Sci. Trans. Med. 8(354): 1-4, 2016.

Clark MJ, et al. U87MG decoded: The genomic sequence of a cytogenetically aberrant human cancer cell line. PLoS Genetics 6 (1) : e1000832, 2010.

Li YM, et al. Molecular identity and cellular distribution of advanced glycation endproduct receptors: relationship of p60 to OST-48 and p90 to 80K-H membrane proteins. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 11047-11052, 1996. PubMed: 8855306

Olopade OI, et al. Molecular analysis of deletions of the short arm of chromosome 9 in human gliomas. Cancer Res. 52: 2523-2529, 1992. PubMed: 1568221

Fogh J, et al. Absence of HeLa cell contamination in 169 cell lines derived from human tumors. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 58: 209-214, 1977. PubMed: 833871

Goodfellow M, et al. One hundred and twenty-seven cultured human tumor cell lines producing tumors in nude mice. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 59: 221-226, 1977. PubMed: 77210034

Beckman G, et al. G-6-PD and PGM phenotypes of 16 continuous human tumor cell lines. Evidence against cross-contamination and contamination by HeLa cells. Hum. Hered. 21: 238-241, 1971. PubMed: 4332744

Ponten J, Macintyre EH. Long term culture of normal and neoplastic human glia. Acta Pathol. Microbiol. Scand. 74: 465-486, 1968. PubMed: 4313504

Tumors developed within 21 days at 100% frequency (5/5).