ATCC ATCC Logo 0

Vibrio campbellii Quorum Sensing

Eye dropper with drop of clear liquid, over top of row of test tubes.

A nonpathogenic model for AI-2-based quorum sensing pathways

 

This study will demonstrate the use of the ATCC Vibrio campbellii Panel (ATCC MP-6) as a nonpathogenic model for AI-2-based quorum sensing pathways. 

Introduction 

In many prokaryotes, cooperative behaviors are regulated through a density-dependent, signal-mediated communication system termed quorum sensing (QS)1 When a bacterial population reaches a critical threshold, autoinducer signaling molecules (AI) specifically bind to a cognate regulatory protein or activate a 2-component signal transduction system, leading to the regulation of group behaviors. In the marine organism Vibrio campbellii, AI signals (AI-1 and AI-2) and cognate regulators are used to regulate bioluminescence1 (Figure 1). Since its discovery, AI-2 has proven ubiquitous within interspecies and intraspecies communication, including that of pathogenic microorganisms.2 Here, we show a panel of 9 V. campbellii strains displaying wild-type or varying mutational phenotypes for use as a nonpathogenic model in the analysis of AI-2-based QS systems. 

Materials and methods 

Nine V. campbellii strains were phenotypically analyzed for QS proficiency by monitoring the bioluminescence production of genotypically diverse strains that were plated together in pairs on Autoinducer Bioassay Medium.1,3-6

Results and discussion

Upon analysis of paired strains, it was determined that bioluminescence could be restored in strains lacking regulator and/or AI production if the adjacent strain was proficient in that characteristic (Figure 2A-C, Table 1). Bioluminescence could not be restored in strains lacking part of the luxCDABE operon, which encodes for bioluminescence (Figure 1, Figure 2D, Table 1).

Figure 1A - Vibrio Campbellii Quorum Sensing Figure 1B - Vibrio Campbellii Quorum Sensing

Figure 1. Quorum sensing

 

Figure 2A - Vibrio Campbellii Quorum Sensing Figure 2B - Vibrio Campbellii Quorum Sensing
Figure 2C - Vibrio Campbellii Quorum Sensing Figure 2D - Vibrio Campbellii Quorum Sensing

Figure 2. Bioluminescence

 

Table 1. ATCC Vibrio campbellii panel. (ATCC MP-6)

 


Autoinducers
1+, 2+ 1+, 2+ 1+, 2+ 1+, 2+ 1+, 2+ 1-, 2+ 1+, 2- 1+, 2- 1-, 2-
Sensors ATCC number 700104 700106 BAA-1116 BAA-1117 BAA-1118 BAA-1119 BAA-1120 BAA-1121 BAA-2363
luxA- 700104 - - - - - - - - -
1+ , 2- 700106 + + + + + + + + +
1+ , 2+ BAA-1116 + + + + + + + + +
1- , 2+ BAA-1117 + + + + + + + + +
1+ , 2- BAA-1118 + + + + + + + + +
1- , 2+ BAA-1119 + + + + + + + + +
1+ , 2+ BAA-1120 + + + + + + + + +
1- , 2+ BAA-1121 + + + + + + - - -
1+ , 2+ BAA-2363 + + + + + - - - -

Sensor 1 = LuxN; Sensor 2 = LuxQ; Autoinducer 1 = AI-1; Autoinducer 1 AI-2; (+) = Light observed; (-) = No light observed.

 

Conclusion

The characterization of these V. campbellii strains illustrates that ATCC MP-6 is well suited as a nonpathogenic model for the analysis of AI-2-based, 2-component regulatory QS pathways. 

Download a PDF of this application note

Download Now
Eye dropper with drop of clear liquid, over top of row of test tubes.

Get the Vibrio campbellii Quorum Sensing Panel

order now

References

  1. Bassler B, Wright M, Silverman M. Multiple signaling systems controlling expression of luminescence in Vibrio harveyi: sequence and function of genes encoding a second sensory pathway. Mol Microbiol 13: 273-286, 1994. 
  2. Galloway WR, et al. Quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria: small-molecule modulation of AHL and AI-2 quorum sensing pathways. Chem Rev 111: 28-67, 2011. 
  3. Surette MG, Miller MB, Bassler BL. Quorum sensing in Escherichia coliSalmonella typhimurium, and Vibrio harveyi: a new family of genes responsible for autoinducer production. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96: 1639-1644, 1999. 
  4. Waters CM, Bassler BL. The Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing system uses shared regulatory components to discriminate between multiple autoinducers. Genes Dev 20: 2754-2767, 2006. 
  5. Bassler BL, Greenberg EP, Stevens AM. Cross-species induction of luminescence in the quorum-sensing bacterium Vibrio harveyi. J Bacteriol 179: 4043-4045, 1997. 
  6. Bassler BL, Wright M, Silverman MR. Sequence and function of LuxO, a negative regulator of luminescence in Vibrio harveyi. Mol Microbiol 12: 403-412, 1994. 
  7. Lin B, et al. Comparative genomic analyses identify the Vibrio harveyi genome sequenced strains BAA-1116 and HY01 as Vibrio campbellii. Environ Microbiol Rep 2(1): 81-89, 2010.