Saos-2 (ATCC® HTB-85)

Organism: Homo sapiens, human  /  Tissue: bone  /  Disease: osteosarcoma

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Organism Homo sapiens, human
Tissue bone
Product Format frozen
Morphology epithelial
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1
Disease osteosarcoma
Age 11 years
Gender female
Ethnicity Caucasian
Applications
This cell line is suitable as a transfection host
Karyotype The stemline chromosome number is hypotriploid with the modal number of 56 chromosomes per cell and the 2S component occurring at 13.2%. Over two-thirds of the chromosome complement consisted of structurally rearranged chromosomes., Most marker chromosomes had complex rearrangements. The origin of the segments composing these markers could not be identified. Of the identifiable markers, 6p+/q+, 7p+, 11p+, and 12p+ occasionally were present at 2 copies per cell., The Y chromosome was not detected in the QM stained preparation.
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Derivation
This is one of an extensive series of human tumor lines isolated and characterized by J. Fogh and G. Trempe.
Clinical Data
11 years
Caucasian
female
The patient was treated with RTG, methotrexate, adriamycin, vincristine, cytoxan, and aramycin-C.
Antigen Expression
Antigen expression: Blood Type B, Rh+; HLA A2, A3, Bw16, Bw47
Receptor Expression Receptor expression: epidermal growth factor (EGF); transforming growth factor beta (type 1 and type 2)
Tumorigenic No
Effects
No, The cells were not tumorigenic in immunosuppressed mice, but did form colonies in semisolid medium.
Comments
The patient was treated with RTG, methotrexate, adriamycin, vincristine, cytoxan, and aramycin-C.
Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated McCoy's 5a Medium Modified , Catalog No. 30-2007. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum to a final concentration of 15%.
Subculturing Remove medium, and rinse with 0.25% trypsin, 0.03% EDTA solution. Remove the solution and add an additional 1 to 2 mL of trypsin-EDTA solution. Allow the flask to sit at room temperature (or at 37°C) until the cells detach. Add fresh culture medium, aspirate and dispense into new culture flasks.
Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:2 to 1:4 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 1 to 2 times per week
Cryopreservation
Culture medium, 95%; DMSO, 5%
Culture Conditions
Atmosphere: air, 95%; carbon dioxide (CO2), 5%
Temperature: 37°C
STR Profile
Amelogenin: X
CSF1PO: 10
D13S317: 12,13
D16S539: 12,13
D5S818: 12
D7S820: 8,10
THO1: 6,9
TPOX: 8
vWA: 18
Isoenzymes
AK-1, 1
ES-D, 2
G6PD, B
GLO-I, 2
Me-2, 1
PGM1, 1-2
PGM3, 1-2
Name of Depositor J Fogh, G Trempe
References

Banerjee C, et al. An AML-1 consensus sequence binds an osteoblast-specific complex and transcriptionally activates the osteoclacin gene. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 4968-4973, 1996. PubMed: 8643513

Fogh J. Human tumor cells in vitro. New York: Plenum Press; 1975.

Fogh J, et al. Absence of HeLa cell contamination in 169 cell lines derived from human tumors. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 58: 209-214, 1977. PubMed: 833871

Goodfellow M, et al. One hundred and twenty-seven cultured human tumor cell lines producing tumors in nude mice. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 59: 221-226, 1977. PubMed: 77210034

Takeuchi Y, et al. Relationship between actions of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and cell surface expression of its receptors in clonal osteoblastic cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 162: 315-321, 1995. PubMed: 7860639

Zhang W, et al. EGF-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in osteoblastic cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 162: 348-358, 1995. PubMed: 7860643

Pollack MS, et al. HLA-A, B, C and DR alloantigen expression on forty-six cultured human tumor cell lines. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 66: 1003-1012, 1981. PubMed: 7017212

Schar BK, et al. Simultaneous detection of all four alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes in human germ cell tumors using reverse transcription-PCR. Cancer Res. 57: 3841-3846, 1997. PubMed: 9288797

Morris GF, et al. Transcriptional activation of the human proliferating-cell nuclear antigen promoter by p53. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 895-899, 1996. PubMed: 8570655

Werner H, et al. Wild-type and mutant p53 differentially regulate transcription of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 8318-8323, 1996. PubMed: 8710868

Wang X, et al. Variabilin, a novel RGD-contining antagonist of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa and platelet aggregation inhibitor from the gard tick Dermacentor variabilis. J. Biol. Chem. 271: 17785-17790, 1996. PubMed: 8663513

Karnieli E, et al. The IGF-1 receptor gene promoter is a molecular target for the Ewing's Sarcoma=Wilms' Tumor 1 fusion protein. J. Biol. Chem. 271: 19304-19309, 1996. PubMed: 8702614

Notice: Necessary PermitsPermits

These permits may be required for shipping this product:

  • Customers located in the state of Hawaii will need to contact the Hawaii Department of Agriculture to determine if an Import Permit is required. A copy of the permit or documentation that a permit is not required must be sent to ATCC in advance of shipment.
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    Date Updated: 3/27/2014

Restrictions

The cells are distributed for research purposes only. The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center releases the cells subject to the following: 1.) The cells or their products must not be distributed to third parties. Commercial interests are the exclusive property of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. 2.) Any proposed commercial use of these cells must first be negotiated with the Office of Technology Development, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065. Contact Tingting Zhang-Kharas, Direct Phone: 646-888-1083, Reception: 646-888-1080, Email: zhangkht@mskcc.org

References

Banerjee C, et al. An AML-1 consensus sequence binds an osteoblast-specific complex and transcriptionally activates the osteoclacin gene. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 4968-4973, 1996. PubMed: 8643513

Fogh J. Human tumor cells in vitro. New York: Plenum Press; 1975.

Fogh J, et al. Absence of HeLa cell contamination in 169 cell lines derived from human tumors. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 58: 209-214, 1977. PubMed: 833871

Goodfellow M, et al. One hundred and twenty-seven cultured human tumor cell lines producing tumors in nude mice. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 59: 221-226, 1977. PubMed: 77210034

Takeuchi Y, et al. Relationship between actions of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and cell surface expression of its receptors in clonal osteoblastic cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 162: 315-321, 1995. PubMed: 7860639

Zhang W, et al. EGF-mediated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases in osteoblastic cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 162: 348-358, 1995. PubMed: 7860643

Pollack MS, et al. HLA-A, B, C and DR alloantigen expression on forty-six cultured human tumor cell lines. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 66: 1003-1012, 1981. PubMed: 7017212

Schar BK, et al. Simultaneous detection of all four alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes in human germ cell tumors using reverse transcription-PCR. Cancer Res. 57: 3841-3846, 1997. PubMed: 9288797

Morris GF, et al. Transcriptional activation of the human proliferating-cell nuclear antigen promoter by p53. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 895-899, 1996. PubMed: 8570655

Werner H, et al. Wild-type and mutant p53 differentially regulate transcription of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 8318-8323, 1996. PubMed: 8710868

Wang X, et al. Variabilin, a novel RGD-contining antagonist of glycoprotein IIb-IIIa and platelet aggregation inhibitor from the gard tick Dermacentor variabilis. J. Biol. Chem. 271: 17785-17790, 1996. PubMed: 8663513

Karnieli E, et al. The IGF-1 receptor gene promoter is a molecular target for the Ewing's Sarcoma=Wilms' Tumor 1 fusion protein. J. Biol. Chem. 271: 19304-19309, 1996. PubMed: 8702614