McCoy [McCoy B] (ATCC® CRL-1696)

Organism: Mus musculus, mouse  /  Cell Type: fibroblast  /  Tissue: unknown  / 

Organism Mus musculus, mouse
Tissue unknown
Cell Type fibroblast
Product Format frozen
Morphology fibroblast
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1
Applications
The cells have been used to propagate laboratory strains of the 15 recognized serotypes of Chlamydia trachomatis.
The cells are susceptible to chlamydia strains, and can be used to propagate chlamydia.
Storage Conditions liquid nitrogen vapor phase
Derivation
The cells were reported to have originated from the synovial fluid in the knee joint of a patient suffering from degenerative arthritis.
Clinical Data
The cells were reported to have originated from the synovial fluid in the knee joint of a patient suffering from degenerative arthritis.
Comments
Little descriptive information about the origin of the McCoy cells appears in the literature. They were first mentioned by Pomerat, et al. RefPomerat CM, et al. Irradiation of cells in tissue culture. I. Giant cell induction in strain cultures versus elements from primary explants. Z. Zellforsch. 47: 158-174, 1957. . The cells were reported to have originated from the synovial fluid in the knee joint of a patient suffering from degenerative arthritis. In ca. 1965, Defendi, et al., showed that McCoy cells (designated McCoy A) were indeed human cells. However, another subline (designated McCoy B) was, in fact, of mouse origin and possessed marker chromosomes characteristic of strain L mouse fibroblasts. McCoy cells presumed to be human, but which actually are mouse cells, have been disseminated from laboratory to laboratory throughout the world. Initial interest in McCoy cells followed the demonstration by Gordon and Quan RefGordon FB, Quan AL. Isolation of the trachoma agent in cell culture. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 118: 354-359, 1965. PubMed: 14268619 and Gordon, et al. RefGordon FB, et al. Effect of ionizing irradiation on susceptibility of McCoy cell cultures to Chlamydia trachomatis. Appl. Microbiol. 23: 123-129, 1972. PubMed: 4110420 that ionizing radiation (cobalt-60) greatly increased the susceptibility of McCoy cells to infection by chlamydia strains. A culture of the so-called McCoy cell line was received from the Centers for Disease Control, Cell Culture Department, Atlanta, GA in March, 1984. Documentation as to origin or passage history was not available. The cells have been used to propagate laboratory strains of the 15 recognized serotypes of Chlamydia trachomatis. The cell line has been satisfactory for chlamydia growth for at least 43 passages at ATCC.
The cells are susceptible to chlamydia strains, and can be used to propagate chlamydia.
Tested and found negative for ectromelia virus (mousepox).
Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, Catalog No. 30-2003. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum to a final concentration of 10%.
Subculturing
Volumes are given for a 75 cm2 flask. Increase or decrease the amount of dissociation medium needed proportionally for culture vessels of other sizes.
  1. Remove and discard culture medium.
  2. Briefly rinse the cell layer with 0.25% (w/v) Trypsin - 0.53 mM EDTA solution to remove all traces of serum which contains trypsin inhibitor.
  3. Add 2.0 to 3.0 mL of Trypsin-EDTA solution to flask and observe cells under an inverted microscope until cell layer is dispersed (usually within 5 to 15 minutes).
    Note: To avoid clumping do not agitate the cells by hitting or shaking the flask while waiting for the cells to detach. Cells that are difficult to detach may be placed at 37°C to facilitate dispersal.
  4. Add 6.0 to 8.0 mL of complete growth medium and aspirate cells by gently pipetting.
  5. Add appropriate aliquots of the cell supension to new culture vessels.
  6. Incubate cultures at 37°C.
Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:2 to 1:4 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 2 to 3 times per week
Culture Conditions
Atmosphere: air, 95%; carbon dioxide (CO2), 5%
Temperature: 37°C
Name of Depositor CDC
Passage History
A culture of the so-called McCoy cell line was received from the Centers for Disease Control, Cell Culture Department, Atlanta, GA in March, 1984. Documentation as to origin or passage history was not available.
References

Pomerat CM, et al. Irradiation of cells in tissue culture. I. Giant cell induction in strain cultures versus elements from primary explants. Z. Zellforsch. 47: 158-174, 1957.

Gordon FB, Quan AL. Isolation of the trachoma agent in cell culture. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 118: 354-359, 1965. PubMed: 14268619

Gordon FB, et al. Effect of ionizing irradiation on susceptibility of McCoy cell cultures to Chlamydia trachomatis. Appl. Microbiol. 23: 123-129, 1972. PubMed: 4110420

Yasin B, et al. Susceptibility of Chlamydia trachomatis to protegrins and defensins. Infect. Immun. 64: 709-713, 1996. PubMed: 8641770

Basic Documentation
References

Pomerat CM, et al. Irradiation of cells in tissue culture. I. Giant cell induction in strain cultures versus elements from primary explants. Z. Zellforsch. 47: 158-174, 1957.

Gordon FB, Quan AL. Isolation of the trachoma agent in cell culture. Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 118: 354-359, 1965. PubMed: 14268619

Gordon FB, et al. Effect of ionizing irradiation on susceptibility of McCoy cell cultures to Chlamydia trachomatis. Appl. Microbiol. 23: 123-129, 1972. PubMed: 4110420

Yasin B, et al. Susceptibility of Chlamydia trachomatis to protegrins and defensins. Infect. Immun. 64: 709-713, 1996. PubMed: 8641770