DU 145 (ATCC® HTB-81)

Organism: Homo sapiens, human  /  Tissue: prostate; derived from metastatic site: brain  /  Disease: carcinoma

Organism Homo sapiens, human
Tissue prostate; derived from metastatic site: brain
Product Format frozen
Morphology epithelial
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1
Disease carcinoma
Age 69 years
Gender male
Ethnicity Caucasian
Applications
This cell line is a suitable transfection host.
Storage Conditions liqid nitrogen vapor temperature
Karyotype This is a hypotriploid human cell line. Both 61 and 62 chromosome numbers had the highest rate of occurrence in 30 metaphase counts.The rate of higher ploidies was 3%. The t(11q12q), del(11)(q23), 16q+, del(9)(p11), del(1)(p32) and 6 other marker chromosomes were found in most cells. The N13 was usually absent. The Y chromosome is abnormal through translocation to an unidentified chromosomal segment. The X chromosome was present in single copy.
Clinical Data
69 years
Caucasian
male
Antigen Expression Antigen expression: Blood Type O; Rh+
Tumorigenic Yes
Effects
Yes, in nude mice; forms adenocarcinoma (grade II) consistent with prostatic primary
Comments
The line is not detectably hormone sensitive, is only weakly positive for acid phosphatase and isolated cells form colonies in soft agar. The cells do not express prostate antigen. Ultrastructural analyses of both the cell line and original tumor revealed microvilli, tonofilaments, desmosomes, any mitochondria, well developed Golgi and heterogenous lysosomes.
Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, Catalog No. 30-2003. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum to a final concentration of 10%.
Subculturing
  1. Remove and discard culture medium.
  2. Briefly rinse the cell layer with 0.25% (w/v) Trypsin - 0.53 mM EDTA solution to remove all traces of serum which contains trypsin inhibitor.
  3. Add 2.0 to 3.0 mL of Trypsin-EDTA solution to flask and observe cells under an inverted microscope until cell layer is dispersed (usually within 5 to 15 minutes).
    Note: To avoid clumping do not agitate the cells by hitting or shaking the flask while waiting for the cells to detach. Cells that are difficult to detach may be placed at 37°C to facilitate dispersal.
  4. Add 6.0 to 8.0 mL of complete growth medium and aspirate cells by gently pipetting.
  5. Add appropriate aliquots of the cell suspension to new culture vessels.
  6. Incubate cultures at 37°C.
Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:4 to 1:6 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 2 to 3 times per week
Cryopreservation
Freeze medium: Complete growth medium, 95%; DMSO, 5%
Storage temperature: liqid nitrogen vapor temperature
Culture Conditions
Atmosphere: air, 95%; carbon dioxide (CO2), 5%
Temperature: 37°C
STR Profile
D7S820: 7, 10, 11
D13S317: 12, 13, 14
D5S818: 10, 13
vWA: 17, 18, 19
THO1: 7
CSF1PO: 10, 11
TPOX: 11
D16S539: 11, 13
Amelogenin: X, Y
Isoenzymes
AK-1, 1
ES-D, 1
G6PD, B
GLO-I, 2
Me-2, 1-2
PGM1, 1
PGM3, 2
Name of Depositor KR Stone
References

Papsidero LD, et al. Prostate antigen: a marker for human prostate epithelial cells. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 66: 37-42, 1981. PubMed: 6935463

Stone KR, et al. Isolation of a human prostate carcinoma cell line (DU 145). Int. J. Cancer 21: 274-281, 1978. PubMed: 631930

Mickey DD, et al. Heterotransplantation of a human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell line in nude mice. Cancer Res. 37: 4049-4058, 1977. PubMed: 908039

Pollack MS, et al. HLA-A, B, C and DR alloantigen expression on forty-six cultured human tumor cell lines. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 66: 1003-1012, 1981. PubMed: 7017212

Hu SX, et al. Development of an adenovirus vector with tetracycline-regulatable human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression. Cancer Res. 57: 3339-3343, 1997. PubMed: 9269991

Sheng S, et al. Maspin acts at the cell membrane to inhibit invasion and motility of mammary and prostatic cancer cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 11669-11674, 1996. PubMed: 8876194

Carter RE, et al. Prostate-specific membrane antigen is a hydrolase with substrate and pharmacologic characteristics of a neuropeptidase. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 749-753, 1996. PubMed: 8570628

Nupponen NN, et al. Genetic alterations in prostate cancer cell lines detected by comparative genomic hybridization. Cancer Genet. Cytogenet. 101: 53-57, 1998. PubMed: 9460501

Robinson D, et al. A tyrosine kinase profile of prostate carcinoma. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 5958-5962, 1996. PubMed: 8650201

Su ZZ, et al. Surface-epitope masking and expression cloning identifies the human prostate carcinoma tumor antigen gene PCTA-1 a member of the galectin gene family. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 7252-7257, 1996. PubMed: 8692978

Zhu X, et al. Cell cycle-dependent modulation of telomerase activity in tumor cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 6091-6095, 1996. PubMed: 8650224

Boffa LC, et al. Invasion of the CAG triplet repeats by a complementary peptide nucleic acid inhibits transcription of the androgen receptor and TATA-binding protein genes and correlates with refolding of an active nucleosome containing a unique AR gene sequence. J. Biol. Chem. 271: 13228-13233, 1996. PubMed: 8662737

DU 145 was isolated by K.R. Stone et al from a lesion in the brain of a patient with metastatic carcinoma of the prostate and a 3 year history of lymphocytic leukemia.

Basic Documentation
References

Papsidero LD, et al. Prostate antigen: a marker for human prostate epithelial cells. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 66: 37-42, 1981. PubMed: 6935463

Stone KR, et al. Isolation of a human prostate carcinoma cell line (DU 145). Int. J. Cancer 21: 274-281, 1978. PubMed: 631930

Mickey DD, et al. Heterotransplantation of a human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell line in nude mice. Cancer Res. 37: 4049-4058, 1977. PubMed: 908039

Pollack MS, et al. HLA-A, B, C and DR alloantigen expression on forty-six cultured human tumor cell lines. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 66: 1003-1012, 1981. PubMed: 7017212

Hu SX, et al. Development of an adenovirus vector with tetracycline-regulatable human tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression. Cancer Res. 57: 3339-3343, 1997. PubMed: 9269991

Sheng S, et al. Maspin acts at the cell membrane to inhibit invasion and motility of mammary and prostatic cancer cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 11669-11674, 1996. PubMed: 8876194

Carter RE, et al. Prostate-specific membrane antigen is a hydrolase with substrate and pharmacologic characteristics of a neuropeptidase. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 749-753, 1996. PubMed: 8570628

Nupponen NN, et al. Genetic alterations in prostate cancer cell lines detected by comparative genomic hybridization. Cancer Genet. Cytogenet. 101: 53-57, 1998. PubMed: 9460501

Robinson D, et al. A tyrosine kinase profile of prostate carcinoma. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 5958-5962, 1996. PubMed: 8650201

Su ZZ, et al. Surface-epitope masking and expression cloning identifies the human prostate carcinoma tumor antigen gene PCTA-1 a member of the galectin gene family. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 7252-7257, 1996. PubMed: 8692978

Zhu X, et al. Cell cycle-dependent modulation of telomerase activity in tumor cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 6091-6095, 1996. PubMed: 8650224

Boffa LC, et al. Invasion of the CAG triplet repeats by a complementary peptide nucleic acid inhibits transcription of the androgen receptor and TATA-binding protein genes and correlates with refolding of an active nucleosome containing a unique AR gene sequence. J. Biol. Chem. 271: 13228-13233, 1996. PubMed: 8662737

DU 145 was isolated by K.R. Stone et al from a lesion in the brain of a patient with metastatic carcinoma of the prostate and a 3 year history of lymphocytic leukemia.