SK-N-SH (ATCC® HTB-11)

Organism: Homo sapiens, human  /  Tissue: brain; derived from metastatic site: bone marrow  /  Disease: neuroblastoma

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Organism Homo sapiens, human
Tissue
brain; derived from metastatic site: bone marrow
Product Format frozen
Morphology epithelial
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1
Disease neuroblastoma
Age 4 years
Gender female
Applications
SK-N-SH has been used as a target cell line in cell mediated cytotoxicity assays and is a suitable transfection host.
Karyotype The cell line is hyperdiploid human female (XX), with the modal chromosome number of 47. Normal chromosomes N9 and N22 are single. One copy of each of these chromosomes is structurally altered to form the two marker chromosomes 9q+ and 22q+., Chromosomes N7 is trisomic. Extra bands were found on one copy of chromosome N7, thereby forming a marker chromosome as described by R.C. Seeger. May have been translocated in part(s) to the q arms of chromosomes N9 and N22.
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Derivation
The SK-N-SH line was developed by J.L. Biedler and differs from SK-N-MC (see ATCC HTB-10) in that it exhibits a longer doubling time and higher levels of dopamine - beta - hydroxylase.
Clinical Data
female
Antigen Expression Blood Type A; Rh+
Genes Expressed
plasminogen activator,shows increased expression of M-CSF after treatment with amyloid-beta peptide.
Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, Catalog No. 30-2003. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum to a final concentration of 10%.
Subculturing
Remove medium, and rinse with 0.25% trypsin, 0.03% EDTA solution. Remove the solution and add an additional 1 to 2 ml of trypsin-EDTA solution. Allow the flask to sit at room temperature (or at 37C) until the cells detach.
Add fresh culture medium, aspirate and dispense into new culture flasks.
Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:3 to 1:8 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 1 to 2 times per week
Cryopreservation
Culture medium, 95%; DMSO, 5%
Culture Conditions
Temperature: 37°C
STR Profile
Amelogenin: X
CSF1PO: 11
D13S317: 11
D16S539: 8,13
D5S818: 12
D7S820: 7,10
THO1: 7,10
TPOX: 8,11
vWA: 14,18
Isoenzymes
AK-1, 1
ES-D, 1
G6PD, B
GLO-I, 1
Me-2, 2
PGM1, 1
PGM3, 1
Name of Depositor G Trempe, LJ Old
References

Gilbert LC, Wachsman JT. Characterization and partial purification of the plasminogen activator from human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-SH. A comparison with human urokinase. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 704: 450-460, 1982. PubMed: 7052133

Spengler BA, et al. Morphology and growth, tumorigenicity, and cytogenetics of human neuroblastoma cells established in vitro. In Vitro 8: 410, 1973.

Fogh J, et al. Absence of HeLa cell contamination in 169 cell lines derived from human tumors. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 58: 209-214, 1977. PubMed: 833871

Bluestein HG. Neurocytotoxic antibodies in serum of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75: 3965-3969, 1978. PubMed: 279013

Seeger RC, et al. Morphology, growth, chromosomal pattern and fibrinolytic activity of two new human neuroblastoma cell lines. Cancer Res. 37: 1364-1371, 1977. PubMed: 856461

Yan SD, et al. Amyloid-beta peptide-Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproduct interaction elicits neuronal expression of macrophage-colony stimulating factor: A proinflammatory pathway in Alzheimer disease. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94: 5296-5301, 1997. PubMed: 9144231

Tsao H, et al. Novel mutations in the p16/CDKN2A binding region of the Cyclin-dependent Kinase-4 gene. Cancer Res. 58: 109-113, 1998. PubMed: 9426066

Rostomily RC, et al. Expression of neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix genes in primitive neuroectodermal tumors. Cancer Res. 57: 3526-3531, 1997. PubMed: 9270024

Chang YE, et al. Properties of the protein encoded by the UL32 open reading frame of herpes simplex virus 1. J. Virol. 70: 3938-3946, 1996. PubMed: 8648731

He B, et al. The carboxyl terminus of the murine MyD116 gene substitutes for the corresponding domain of the gamma134.5 gene of herpes simplex virus to preclude the premature shutoff of total protein synthesis in infected human cells. J. Virol. 70: 84-90, 1996. PubMed: 8523596

Yoshikawa T, et al. Downstream regulatory elements increase acute and latent herpes simplex virus type 2 latency-associated transcript expression but do not influence recurrence phenotype or establishment of latency. J. Virol. 70: 1535-1541, 1996. PubMed: 8627672

Notice: Necessary PermitsPermits

These permits may be required for shipping this product:

  • Customers located in the state of Hawaii will need to contact the Hawaii Department of Agriculture to determine if an Import Permit is required. A copy of the permit or documentation that a permit is not required must be sent to ATCC in advance of shipment.
Basic Documentation
Other Documentation
Restrictions

The cells are distributed for research purposes only. The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center releases the cells subject to the following: 1.) The cells or their products must not be distributed to third parties. Commercial interests are the exclusive property of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. 2.) Any proposed commercial use of these cells must first be negotiated with the Office of Technology Development, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065. Contact Tingting Zhang-Kharas, Direct Phone: 646-888-1083, Reception: 646-888-1080, Email: zhangkht@mskcc.org

References

Gilbert LC, Wachsman JT. Characterization and partial purification of the plasminogen activator from human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-SH. A comparison with human urokinase. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 704: 450-460, 1982. PubMed: 7052133

Spengler BA, et al. Morphology and growth, tumorigenicity, and cytogenetics of human neuroblastoma cells established in vitro. In Vitro 8: 410, 1973.

Fogh J, et al. Absence of HeLa cell contamination in 169 cell lines derived from human tumors. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 58: 209-214, 1977. PubMed: 833871

Bluestein HG. Neurocytotoxic antibodies in serum of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 75: 3965-3969, 1978. PubMed: 279013

Seeger RC, et al. Morphology, growth, chromosomal pattern and fibrinolytic activity of two new human neuroblastoma cell lines. Cancer Res. 37: 1364-1371, 1977. PubMed: 856461

Yan SD, et al. Amyloid-beta peptide-Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproduct interaction elicits neuronal expression of macrophage-colony stimulating factor: A proinflammatory pathway in Alzheimer disease. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 94: 5296-5301, 1997. PubMed: 9144231

Tsao H, et al. Novel mutations in the p16/CDKN2A binding region of the Cyclin-dependent Kinase-4 gene. Cancer Res. 58: 109-113, 1998. PubMed: 9426066

Rostomily RC, et al. Expression of neurogenic basic helix-loop-helix genes in primitive neuroectodermal tumors. Cancer Res. 57: 3526-3531, 1997. PubMed: 9270024

Chang YE, et al. Properties of the protein encoded by the UL32 open reading frame of herpes simplex virus 1. J. Virol. 70: 3938-3946, 1996. PubMed: 8648731

He B, et al. The carboxyl terminus of the murine MyD116 gene substitutes for the corresponding domain of the gamma134.5 gene of herpes simplex virus to preclude the premature shutoff of total protein synthesis in infected human cells. J. Virol. 70: 84-90, 1996. PubMed: 8523596

Yoshikawa T, et al. Downstream regulatory elements increase acute and latent herpes simplex virus type 2 latency-associated transcript expression but do not influence recurrence phenotype or establishment of latency. J. Virol. 70: 1535-1541, 1996. PubMed: 8627672