SW480 [SW-480] (ATCC® CCL-228)

Organism: Homo sapiens, human  /  Tissue: colon  /  Disease: Dukes' type B, colorectal adenocarcinoma

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Organism Homo sapiens, human
Tissue colon
Product Format frozen
Morphology epithelial
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1
Disease Dukes' type B, colorectal adenocarcinoma
Age 50 years
Gender male
Ethnicity Caucasian
Applications

This cell line is a suitable transfection host.

This line has a mutation in codon 12 of the ras proto-oncogene, and can be used as a positive control for PCR assays of mutation in this codon.

Storage Conditions liquid nitrogen vapor phase
Karyotype The stemline chromosome number is hypotriploid and 11-12 marker chromosomes were common. Both double minutes and dicentrics were observed in 8% of each metaphase examined.
Images
Derivation
SW480 was established from a primary adenocarcinoma of the colon.
Clinical Data
50 years
Caucasian
male
Receptor Expression
epidermal growth factor (EGF)
Oncogene myc +; myb + ; ras +; fos +; sis +; p53 +; abl -; ros -; src -
Genes Expressed
carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) 0.7 ng/10 6 cells/10 days; keratin; transforming growth factor beta,myc +; myb + ; ras +; fos +; sis +; p53 +; abl -; ros -; src -,HLA A2, B8, B17; blood type A; Rh+,The cells are positive for keratin by immunoperoxidase staining.,The line is positive for expression of c-myc, K-ras, H-ras, N-ras, myb, sis and fos oncogenes.
Tumorigenic Yes. Tumors developed within 21 days at 100% frequency (5/5) in nude mice inoculated subcutaneously with 10(7) cells.
Effects
Yes, in nude mice
Virus Susceptibility Human immunodeficiency virus 1 , Human immunodeficiency virus 1
Comments

A cell line established from a lymph node metastasis taken from the same patient one year later is available (see ATCC CCL-227).

The line is negative for CSAp (CSAp-) and colon antigen 3.

The cells are positive for keratin by immunoperoxidase staining.

There is a G -> A mutation in codon 273 of the p53 gene resulting in an Arg -> His substitution and a C -> T mutation in codon 309 resulting in a Pro -> Ser substitution.

The cells express elevated levels of p53 protein.

The line is positive for expression of c-myc, K-ras, H-ras, N-ras, myb, sis and fos oncogenes.

N-myc oncogene expression was not detected.

Matrilysin, a metalloproteinase associated with tumor invasiveness, is not expressed.

The cells have been reported to produce GM-CSF.

Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated Leibovitz's L-15 Medium, Catalog No. 30-2008. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum to a final concentration of 10%.

(Note: The L-15 medium formulation was devised for use in a free gas exchange with atmospheric air. A CO2 and air mixture is detrimental to cells when using this medium for cultivation)


Subculturing
Volumes are given for a 75 cm2 flask. Increase or decrease the amount of dissociation medium needed proportionally for culture vessels of other sizes.
  1. Remove and discard culture medium.
  2. Briefly rinse the cell layer with 0.25% (w/v) Trypsin- 0.53 mM EDTA solution to remove all traces of serum which contains trypsin inhibitor.
  3. Add 2.0 to 3.0 mL of Trypsin-EDTA solution to flask and observe cells under an inverted microscope until cell layer is dispersed (usually within 5 to 15 minutes).
    Note: To avoid clumping do not agitate the cells by hitting or shaking the flask while waiting for the cells to detach. Cells that are difficult to detach may be placed at 37°C to facilitate dispersal.
  4. Add 6.0 to 8.0 mL of complete growth medium and aspirate cells by gently pipetting.
  5. Add appropriate aliquots of the cell suspension to new culture vessels.
  6. Incubate cultures at 37°C. without CO2.
Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:2 to 1:8 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 1 to 2 times per week
Cryopreservation
Freeze medium: Complete growth medium supplemented with 5% (v/v) DMSO
Storage temperature: liquid nitrogen vapor phase
Culture Conditions
Atmosphere: air, 100%
Temperature: 37°C
STR Profile
Amelogenin: X
CSF1PO: 13,14
D13S317: 12
D16S539: 13
D5S818: 13
D7S820: 8
THO1: 8
TPOX: 11
vWA: 16
Isoenzymes
ES-D, 1
G6PD, B
PEP-D, 1
PGD, A
PGM1, 2
PGM3, 1
Name of Depositor A Leibovitz
References

Fogh J, et al. Absence of HeLa cell contamination in 169 cell lines derived from human tumors. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 58: 209-214, 1977. PubMed: 833871

Fogh J, et al. One hundred and twenty-seven cultured human tumor cell lines producing tumors in nude mice. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 59: 221-226, 1977. PubMed: 327080

Lelbovitz A, et al. Detection and analysis of a glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase phenotype B cell line contamination. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 63: 635-645, 1979. PubMed: 288927

Adachi A, et al. Productive, persistent infection of human colorectal cell lines with human immunodeficiency virus. J. Virol. 61: 209-213, 1987. PubMed: 3640832

Schroy PC, et al. Detection of p21ras mutations in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cancer 76: 201-209, 1995. PubMed: 8625092

Trainer DL, et al. Biological characterization and oncogene expression in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Int. J. Cancer 41: 287-296, 1988. PubMed: 3338874

Weiss J, et al. Mutation and expression of the p53 gene in malignant melanoma cell lines. Int. J. Cancer 54: 693-699, 1993. PubMed: 8514460

Nigro JM, et al. Mutations in the p53 gene occur in diverse human tumour types. Nature 342: 705-707, 1989. PubMed: 2531845

Barnett SW, et al. Characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains recovered from the bowel of infected individuals. Virology 182: 802-809, 1991. PubMed: 2024498

Leibovitz A, et al. Classification of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Cancer Res. 36: 4562-4569, 1976. PubMed: 1000501

Geiser AG, et al. Suppression of tumorigenicity in human cell hybrids derived from cell lines expressing different activated ras oncogenes. Cancer Res. 49: 1572-1577, 1989. PubMed: 2647289

Lahm H, et al. Secretion of bioactive granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by human colorectal carcinoma cells. Cancer Res. 54: 3700-3702, 1994. PubMed: 8033086

Rodrigues NR, et al. p53 mutations in colorectal cancer. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87: 7555-7559, 1990. PubMed: 1699228

Santoro IM, Groden J. Alternative splicing of the APC gene and its association with terminal differentiation. Cancer Res. 57: 488-494, 1997. PubMed: 9012479

Tsao H, et al. Novel mutations in the p16/CDKN2A binding region of the Cyclin-dependent Kinase-4 gene. Cancer Res. 58: 109-113, 1998. PubMed: 9426066

Zhu X, et al. Cell cycle-dependent modulation of telomerase activity in tumor cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 6091-6095, 1996. PubMed: 8650224

Witty JP, et al. Modulation of matrilysin levels in colon carcinoma cell lines affects tumorigenicity in vivo. Cancer Res. 54: 4805-4812, 1994. PubMed: 8062282

Notice: Necessary PermitsPermits

These permits may be required for shipping this product:

  • Customers located in the state of Hawaii will need to contact the Hawaii Department of Agriculture to determine if an Import Permit is required. A copy of the permit or documentation that a permit is not required must be sent to ATCC in advance of shipment.
Basic Documentation
Other Documentation
References

Fogh J, et al. Absence of HeLa cell contamination in 169 cell lines derived from human tumors. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 58: 209-214, 1977. PubMed: 833871

Fogh J, et al. One hundred and twenty-seven cultured human tumor cell lines producing tumors in nude mice. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 59: 221-226, 1977. PubMed: 327080

Lelbovitz A, et al. Detection and analysis of a glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase phenotype B cell line contamination. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 63: 635-645, 1979. PubMed: 288927

Adachi A, et al. Productive, persistent infection of human colorectal cell lines with human immunodeficiency virus. J. Virol. 61: 209-213, 1987. PubMed: 3640832

Schroy PC, et al. Detection of p21ras mutations in colorectal adenomas and carcinomas by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cancer 76: 201-209, 1995. PubMed: 8625092

Trainer DL, et al. Biological characterization and oncogene expression in human colorectal carcinoma cell lines. Int. J. Cancer 41: 287-296, 1988. PubMed: 3338874

Weiss J, et al. Mutation and expression of the p53 gene in malignant melanoma cell lines. Int. J. Cancer 54: 693-699, 1993. PubMed: 8514460

Nigro JM, et al. Mutations in the p53 gene occur in diverse human tumour types. Nature 342: 705-707, 1989. PubMed: 2531845

Barnett SW, et al. Characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains recovered from the bowel of infected individuals. Virology 182: 802-809, 1991. PubMed: 2024498

Leibovitz A, et al. Classification of human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Cancer Res. 36: 4562-4569, 1976. PubMed: 1000501

Geiser AG, et al. Suppression of tumorigenicity in human cell hybrids derived from cell lines expressing different activated ras oncogenes. Cancer Res. 49: 1572-1577, 1989. PubMed: 2647289

Lahm H, et al. Secretion of bioactive granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor by human colorectal carcinoma cells. Cancer Res. 54: 3700-3702, 1994. PubMed: 8033086

Rodrigues NR, et al. p53 mutations in colorectal cancer. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87: 7555-7559, 1990. PubMed: 1699228

Santoro IM, Groden J. Alternative splicing of the APC gene and its association with terminal differentiation. Cancer Res. 57: 488-494, 1997. PubMed: 9012479

Tsao H, et al. Novel mutations in the p16/CDKN2A binding region of the Cyclin-dependent Kinase-4 gene. Cancer Res. 58: 109-113, 1998. PubMed: 9426066

Zhu X, et al. Cell cycle-dependent modulation of telomerase activity in tumor cells. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93: 6091-6095, 1996. PubMed: 8650224

Witty JP, et al. Modulation of matrilysin levels in colon carcinoma cell lines affects tumorigenicity in vivo. Cancer Res. 54: 4805-4812, 1994. PubMed: 8062282