Hs68 (ATCC® CRL-1635)

Organism: Homo sapiens, human  /  Cell Type: fibroblast  /  Tissue: skin; foreskin  /  Disease: aspartoacylase deficiency; possible Canavan disease

Organism Homo sapiens, human
Tissue skin; foreskin
Cell Type fibroblast
Product Format frozen
Morphology fibroblast
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1
Disease aspartoacylase deficiency; possible Canavan disease
Age newborn
Gender male
Ethnicity Caucasian
Karyotype This is a human cell line with the normal 46,XY karyotype. The modal chromosome number was 46, with polyploidy at 3.6%. Both X and Y chromosomes can be identified clearly.
Derivation
Hs68 is one of a series of human foreskin fibroblast lines developed at the Naval Biosciences Laboratory (NBL) in Oakland, CA. The material was obtained from an apparently normal Caucasian newborn male in February, 1969.
Clinical Data
Caucasian
male
newborn
Comments

Longevity studies carried out at NBL demonstrated that the cells could be propagated for 42 passages.

The ATCC has been informed by Dr. Anne B. Johnson, Department of Pathology and Neuroscience at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, that this cell line has an unusually low level of the enzyme aspartoacylase (0.028 mU/mg or less on repeat assays.

Our records indicate that the donor of Hs 68 was apparently normal, but Dr. Johnson pointed out that individuals exhibiting a deficiency in aspartoacylase suffer from Canavan disease. Canavan disease is a devastating, autosomal recessive disorder involving spongy degeneration of the nervous system.According to Dr. Johnson, fibroblasts from affected children have aspartoacylase levels of 0.003 to 0.02 mU/mg; carriers' levels vary from 0.016 to 0.04 mU/mg and normal run from 0.1 to 0.4 mU/mg. More information on aspartoacylase and Canavan disease can be found in an article by R. Kaul et al.
RefKaul, P et al. Purification, characterization, and localization of aspartoacylase from bovine brain. J. Neurochem. 56(1): 129-135, 1991. PubMed: 1987315
Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium, Catalog No. 30-2002. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum to a final concentration of 10%.
Subculturing
Remove medium, and rinse with 0.25% trypsin, 0.03% EDTA solution. Remove the solution and add an additional 1 to 2 mL of trypsin-EDTA solution. Allow the flask to sit at room temperature (or at 37°C) until the cells detach.
Add fresh culture medium, aspirate and dispense into new culture flasks.
Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:4 to 1:8 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 2 to 3 times per week
Cryopreservation
culture medium 95%; DMSO, 5%
Culture Conditions
Temperature: 37°C
STR Profile
Amelogenin: X,Y
CSF1PO: 9,12
D13S317: 11,13
D16S539: 11,12
D5S818: 8,11
D7S820: 11,12
THO1: 6,9.3
TPOX: 11
vWA: 16
Name of Depositor RB Owens
Passage History
Longevity studies carried out at NBL demonstrated that the cells could be propagated for 42 passages.
References

Kapatos G. Tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis rate and turnover time in neuronal cultures from embryonic rat mesencephalon and hypothalamus. J. Neurochem. 55: 129-136, 1990. PubMed: 2355214

Sayles PC, Johnson LL. Intact immune defenses are required for mice to resist the ts-4 vaccine strain of Toxoplasma gondii. Infect. Immun. 64: 3088-3092, 1996. PubMed: 8757838

Kaul, P et al. Purification, characterization, and localization of aspartoacylase from bovine brain. J. Neurochem. 56(1): 129-135, 1991. PubMed: 1987315

Basic Documentation
References

Kapatos G. Tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis rate and turnover time in neuronal cultures from embryonic rat mesencephalon and hypothalamus. J. Neurochem. 55: 129-136, 1990. PubMed: 2355214

Sayles PC, Johnson LL. Intact immune defenses are required for mice to resist the ts-4 vaccine strain of Toxoplasma gondii. Infect. Immun. 64: 3088-3092, 1996. PubMed: 8757838

Kaul, P et al. Purification, characterization, and localization of aspartoacylase from bovine brain. J. Neurochem. 56(1): 129-135, 1991. PubMed: 1987315