IC-21 (ATCC® TIB-186)

Organism: Mus musculus, mouse  /  Cell Type: peritoneal macrophage; SV40 transformed  / 

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Organism Mus musculus, mouse
Cell Type peritoneal macrophage; SV40 transformed
Product Format frozen
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 2 [Cells contain polyomavirus DNA sequences]

Biosafety  classification is based on U.S. Public Health Service Guidelines, it is the responsibility of the customer to ensure that their facilities comply with biosafety regulations for their own country.

Strain C57BL/6
Applications
Biological response RefSinger JA, et al. Interaction of a mouse macrophage cell line with homologous erythrocytes. J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 31: 489-499, 1982. PubMed: 7120230  
transfection host 
Derivation
The IC-21 cell line was derived by transformation of normal C57BL/6 mouse peritoneal macrophages with SV40.
Receptor Expression

Receptor expression: Fc RefWalker WS. Separate Fc-receptors for immunoglobulins IgG2a and IgG2b on an established cell line of mouse macrophages. J. Immunol. 116: 911-914, 1976. PubMed: 1254971, complement (C3) RefWalker WS, Gandour DM. Detection and functional assessment of complement receptors on two murine macrophage-like cell lines. Exp. Cell Res. 129: 15-21, 1980. PubMed: 7428810

Genes Expressed
lysozyme
Cellular Products
lysozyme
Comments
This line shares many properties with normal mouse macrophages and display macrophage specific antigens.
They have phagocytic and cytolytic properties, can lyse tumor targets in vitro and appear to be more differentiated than cells of the P388D1 macrophage line.
Trypsin is toxic to this line.
The cells produce large quantities of acid and the medium should be changed frequently.
Tested and found negative for ectromelia virus (mousepox).
Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated RPMI-1640 Medium, ATCC 30-2001. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum (ATCC 30-2020) to a final concentration of 10%.
Subculturing
Rinse the monolayer twice with 10 to 15 mL of Ca++/Mg++-free PBS (ATCC® No. 30-2200),  then add an additional 10 to 15 mL of the same solution to the cells. Let the culture stand for 5 to 10 minutes at room temperature, then gently bang or tap the flask, or use a sterile cell scraper to dislodge any adherent cells. Pipette the detached cells up and down using a 5 or 10 ml sterile pipette to break up the clumps but avoid the creation of foam. Centrifuge the cells at 125 x g for 5 to 7 minutes and aspirate the supernatant. Gently resuspend the cells in complete growth medium and perform a cell count to calculate the total viable cell number. Subculture the cells into new vessels using a split ratio of 1:2 to 1:4.
Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:2 to 1:4 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 3 times per week
Cryopreservation
culture medium 95%; DMSO, 5%
Culture Conditions
Temperature: 37.0°C
Atmosphere: air, 95%; carbon dioxide (CO2), 5%
Name of Depositor WS Walker
References

Walker WS. Separate Fc-receptors for immunoglobulins IgG2a and IgG2b on an established cell line of mouse macrophages. J. Immunol. 116: 911-914, 1976. PubMed: 1254971

Walker WS, Gandour DM. Detection and functional assessment of complement receptors on two murine macrophage-like cell lines. Exp. Cell Res. 129: 15-21, 1980. PubMed: 7428810

Walker WS. Mediation of macrophage cytolytic and phagocytic activities by antibodies of different classes and class-specific Fc-receptors. J. Immunol. 119: 367-373, 1977. PubMed: 886183

Mocarelli P, et al. A permanent line of macrophages with normal activity in a primary antibody response in vitro. Immunol. Commun. 2: 441-447, 1973. PubMed: 4357034

Mauel J, Defendi V. Infection and transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages by simian virus 40. J. Exp. Med. 134: 335-350, 1971. PubMed: 4326994

Holden HT, et al. . Fed. Proc. 38: 1093 (abstract 4582), 1979.

Walker WS, Demus A. Antibody-dependent cytolysis of chicken erythrocytes by an in vitro- established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages. J. Immunol. 114: 765-769, 1975. PubMed: 1167563

Singer JA, et al. Interaction of a mouse macrophage cell line with homologous erythrocytes. J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 31: 489-499, 1982. PubMed: 7120230

Takao S, et al. Role of reactive oxygen metabolites in murine peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis and phagocytic killing. Am. J. Physiol. 271: C1278-C1284, 1996. PubMed: 8897835

Serio C, et al. Macrophage functional heterogeneity: evidence for different antibody-dependent effector cell activities and expression of Fc-receptors among macrophage subpopulations. J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 25: 197-206, 1979. PubMed: 439098

Standard Practice for Testing for Biological Responses to Particles in Vitro. West Conshohocken, PA:ASTM International;ASTM Standard Test Method F 1903-98R03.

Notice: Necessary PermitsPermits

These permits may be required for shipping this product:

  • Customers located in the state of Hawaii will need to contact the Hawaii Department of Agriculture to determine if an Import Permit is required. A copy of the permit or documentation that a permit is not required must be sent to ATCC in advance of shipment.
Basic Documentation
FAQ's
  1. Morphology of ATCC® TIB-186


    Date Updated: 3/27/2014

References

Walker WS. Separate Fc-receptors for immunoglobulins IgG2a and IgG2b on an established cell line of mouse macrophages. J. Immunol. 116: 911-914, 1976. PubMed: 1254971

Walker WS, Gandour DM. Detection and functional assessment of complement receptors on two murine macrophage-like cell lines. Exp. Cell Res. 129: 15-21, 1980. PubMed: 7428810

Walker WS. Mediation of macrophage cytolytic and phagocytic activities by antibodies of different classes and class-specific Fc-receptors. J. Immunol. 119: 367-373, 1977. PubMed: 886183

Mocarelli P, et al. A permanent line of macrophages with normal activity in a primary antibody response in vitro. Immunol. Commun. 2: 441-447, 1973. PubMed: 4357034

Mauel J, Defendi V. Infection and transformation of mouse peritoneal macrophages by simian virus 40. J. Exp. Med. 134: 335-350, 1971. PubMed: 4326994

Holden HT, et al. . Fed. Proc. 38: 1093 (abstract 4582), 1979.

Walker WS, Demus A. Antibody-dependent cytolysis of chicken erythrocytes by an in vitro- established line of mouse peritoneal macrophages. J. Immunol. 114: 765-769, 1975. PubMed: 1167563

Singer JA, et al. Interaction of a mouse macrophage cell line with homologous erythrocytes. J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 31: 489-499, 1982. PubMed: 7120230

Takao S, et al. Role of reactive oxygen metabolites in murine peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis and phagocytic killing. Am. J. Physiol. 271: C1278-C1284, 1996. PubMed: 8897835

Serio C, et al. Macrophage functional heterogeneity: evidence for different antibody-dependent effector cell activities and expression of Fc-receptors among macrophage subpopulations. J. Reticuloendothel. Soc. 25: 197-206, 1979. PubMed: 439098

Standard Practice for Testing for Biological Responses to Particles in Vitro. West Conshohocken, PA:ASTM International;ASTM Standard Test Method F 1903-98R03.