Sol8 (ATCC® CRL-2174)

Organism: Mus musculus, mouse  /  Cell Type: myoblast  /  Tissue: skeletal muscle  / 

Organism Mus musculus, mouse
Tissue skeletal muscle
Cell Type myoblast
Product Format frozen
Morphology fibroblast
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1
Age 4 weeks
Strain C3H
Storage Conditions liquid nitrogen vapor phase
Derivation

Sol8 is a myogenic cell line isolated by Daubas et al. from primary cultures of soleus muscle taken from the leg of a normal C3H mouse.

The cells were split two times and then cloned by limiting dilution.

Comments

Sol8 cells will differentiate into myotubes with serum deprivation.

They have a phenotype similar to slow twitch fibers.

Note: Do not allow the cells to become confluent. The myoblast component of the population will rapidly become depleted if the culture becomes confluent.

Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium, Catalog No. 30-2002. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum to a final concentration of 20%.
Subculturing Volumes used in this protocol are for 75 cm2 flask; proportionally reduce or increase amount of dissociation medium for culture vessels of other sizes.
Note: Never allow the cells to become confluent. Subculture at 50% of confluence.
  1. Remove and discard culture medium.
  2. Briefly rinse the cell layer with 0.25% (w/v) Trypsin-0.53mM EDTA solution to remove all traces of serum, which contains trypsin inhibitor.
  3. Add 2.0 to 3.0 mL of Trypsin-EDTA solution to flask and observe cells under an inverted microscope until cell layer is dispersed (usually within 5 to 15 minutes).
    Note: To avoid clumping do not agitate the cells by hitting or shaking the flask while waiting for the cells to detach. Cells that are difficult to detach may be placed at 37°C to facilitate dispersal.
  4. Add 6.0 to 8.0 mL of complete growth medium and aspirate cells by gently pipetting.
  5. Add appropriate aliquots of the cell suspension to new culture vessels.
  6. Incubate cultures at 37°C.

Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:8 to 1:12 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 2 to 3 times per week

Note: For more information on enzymatic dissociation and subculturing of cell lines consult Chapter 10 in Culture of Animal Cells, a manual of Basic Technique by R. Ian Freshney, 3rd edition, published by Alan R. Liss, N.Y., 1994.

Cryopreservation
Culture medium, 95%; DMSO, 5%. Cell culture tested DMSO is available as ATCC Catalog No. 4-X.
Population Doubling Time 16 to 18 hrs
Name of Depositor R Bassel-Duby
References

Daubas P, et al. Functional activity of the two promoters of the myosin alkali light chain gene in primary muscle cell cultures: comparison with other muscle gene promoters and other culture systems. Nucleic Acids Res. 16: 1251-1271, 1988. PubMed: 2894633

Li CY, et al. Potential role of WAF1/Cip1/p21 as a mediator of TGF-beta cytoinhibitory effect. J. Biol. Chem. 270: 4971-4974, 1995. PubMed: 7890601

Hay, R. J., Caputo, J. L., and Macy, M. L., Eds. (1992), ATCC Quality Control Methods for Cell Lines. 2nd edition, Published by ATCC.

Caputo, J. L., Biosafety procedures in cell culture. J. Tissue Culture Methods 11:223-227, 1988.

Fleming, D.O., Richardson, J. H., Tulis, J.J. and Vesley, D., (1995) Laboratory Safety: Principles and Practice. Second edition, ASM press, Washington, DC.

Basic Documentation
References

Daubas P, et al. Functional activity of the two promoters of the myosin alkali light chain gene in primary muscle cell cultures: comparison with other muscle gene promoters and other culture systems. Nucleic Acids Res. 16: 1251-1271, 1988. PubMed: 2894633

Li CY, et al. Potential role of WAF1/Cip1/p21 as a mediator of TGF-beta cytoinhibitory effect. J. Biol. Chem. 270: 4971-4974, 1995. PubMed: 7890601

Hay, R. J., Caputo, J. L., and Macy, M. L., Eds. (1992), ATCC Quality Control Methods for Cell Lines. 2nd edition, Published by ATCC.

Caputo, J. L., Biosafety procedures in cell culture. J. Tissue Culture Methods 11:223-227, 1988.

Fleming, D.O., Richardson, J. H., Tulis, J.J. and Vesley, D., (1995) Laboratory Safety: Principles and Practice. Second edition, ASM press, Washington, DC.