BHK-21 [C-13] (ATCC® CCL-10)

Organism: Mesocricetus auratus, hamster, Syrian golden  /  Cell Type: fibroblast  /  Tissue: kidney  /  Disease: normal

Organism Mesocricetus auratus, hamster, Syrian golden
Tissue kidney
Cell Type fibroblast
Product Format frozen
Morphology fibroblast
Culture Properties adherent
Biosafety Level 1
Disease normal
Age 1 day old newborn
Applications

The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) uses these cells for routine diagnosis of rabies. 

This cell line has been used as a host for transformation with expression vectors containing selectable and amplifiable marker DNAs (e.g., Factor VIII, see ATCC CRL-8544).

Storage Conditions liquid nitrogen vapor phase
Karyotype Chromosome Frequency Distribution 50 Cells: 2n = 44. This is a pseudodiploid line with the tetraploidy occurring at 4%. The karyotype is 44,XY,-6,-15,6q+,15q+ in a majority of cells analyzed. The markers 6q+ and 15q+ occurred in most cells. An occasional monosomic or trisomic condition for a normal chromosome was also detected. Note: Cytogenetic information is based on initial seed stock at ATCC. Cytogenetic instability has been reported in the literature for some cell lines.
Images
Derivation
The parent line of BHK-21(C-13) was derived from baby hamster kidneys of five unsexed, 1-day-old hamsters in March, 1961, by I.A. Macpherson and M.G.P. Stoker.

Following 84 days of continuous cultivation, interrupted only by an 8-day preservation by freezing, clone 13 was initiated by single-cell isolation.
Virus Susceptibility Human adenovirus 25
Reovirus 3
Vesicular stomatitis virus
Human poliovirus 2
Comments

This cell line is reverse transcriptase negative.

Complete Growth Medium The base medium for this cell line is ATCC-formulated Eagle's Minimum Essential Medium, Catalog No. 30-2003. To make the complete growth medium, add the following components to the base medium: fetal bovine serum to a final concentration of 10%.
Subculturing

Volumes used in this protocol are for 75 cm2 flask; proportionally reduce or increase amount of dissociation medium for culture vessels of other sizes. Corning® T-75 flasks (catalog #430641) are recommended for subculturing this product.

  1. Remove and discard culture medium. 
  2. Briefly rinse the cell layer with 0.25% (w/v) Trypsin-0.53mM EDTA solution to remove all traces of serum which contains trypsin inhibitor.
  3. Add 2.0 to 3.0 mL of Trypsin-EDTA solution to flask and observe cells under an inverted microscope until cell  layer is  dispersed (usually within 5 to 15 minutes). Note: To avoid clumping do not agitate the cells by hitting or shaking the flask while waiting for the cells to detach.  Cells that are difficult to detach may be placed at 37ºC to facilitate dispersal.
  4. Add 6.0 to 8.0 mL of complete growth medium and aspirate  cells by gently pipetting. 
  5. Add appropriate aliquots of the cell suspension to new culture vessels.
Subcultivation Ratio: A subcultivation ratio of 1:2 to 1:10 is recommended
Medium Renewal: 1 to 2 times per week
Cryopreservation
Freeze medium: Complete growth medium 95%; DMSO, 5%
Storage temperature: liquid nitrogen vapor phase
Culture Conditions
Temperature: 37°C
Name of Depositor I Macpherson
Year of Origin March, 1961
References

Drayna D, et al. Genetic mapping and diagnosis of haemophilia A achieved through a BclI polymorphism in the factor VIII gene. Nature 314: 738-740, 1985. PubMed: 2986011

Kazazian HH Jr., et al. Restriction site polymorphism in the phosphoglycerate kinase gene on the X chromosome. Hum. Genet. 66: 217-219, 1984. PubMed: 6325324

Macpherson I, Stoker M. Polyoma transformation of hamster cell clones--an investigation of genetic factors affecting cell competence. Virology 16: 147-151, 1962. PubMed: 14468055

Macpherson, et al. Polyoma transformation of hamster cell clones - an investigation of genetic factors affecting cell competence. Virology 14: 359-370, 1961.

Macpherson I. Characteristics of a hamster cell clone transformed by polyoma virus. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 30: 795-815, 1963.

Deleersnyder V, et al. Formation of native hepatitis C virus glycoprotein complexes. J. Virol. 71: 697-704, 1997. PubMed: 8985401

Yang TT, et al. Quantification of gene expression with a secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter system. BioTechniques 23: 1110-1114, 1997. PubMed: 9421645

Hussain MA, et al. POU domain transcription factor brain 4 confers pancreatic alpha-cell-specific expression of the proglucagon gene through interaction with a novel proximal promoter G1 element. Mol. Cell. Biol. 17: 7186-7194, 1997. PubMed: 9372951

You M, et al. ch-IAp1, a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein family, is a mediator of the antiapoptotic activity of the v-Rel oncoprotein. Mol. Cell. Biol. 17: 7328-7341, 1997. PubMed: 9372964

Jelachich ML, Lipton HL. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus kills restrictive but not permissive cells by apoptosis. J. Virol. 70: 6856-6861, 1996. PubMed: 8794327

Schnell MJ, et al. The minimal conserved transcription stop-start signal promotes stable expression of a foreign gene in vesicular stomatitis virus. J. Virol. 70: 2318-2323, 1996. PubMed: 8642658

Chang YE, et al. Properties of the protein encoded by the UL32 open reading frame of herpes simplex virus 1. J. Virol. 70: 3938-3946, 1996. PubMed: 8648731

Biological evaluation of medical devices. Part 5: Tests for in vitro cytotoxicity. Sydney, NSW, Australia:Standards Australia;Standards Australia AS ISO 10993.5-2002.

Biological evaluation of medical devices--Part 5: Tests for in vitro cytotoxicity. Geneva (Switzerland):International Organization for Standardization/ANSI;ISO ISO 10993-5:1999.

Basic Documentation
Other Documentation
References

Drayna D, et al. Genetic mapping and diagnosis of haemophilia A achieved through a BclI polymorphism in the factor VIII gene. Nature 314: 738-740, 1985. PubMed: 2986011

Kazazian HH Jr., et al. Restriction site polymorphism in the phosphoglycerate kinase gene on the X chromosome. Hum. Genet. 66: 217-219, 1984. PubMed: 6325324

Macpherson I, Stoker M. Polyoma transformation of hamster cell clones--an investigation of genetic factors affecting cell competence. Virology 16: 147-151, 1962. PubMed: 14468055

Macpherson, et al. Polyoma transformation of hamster cell clones - an investigation of genetic factors affecting cell competence. Virology 14: 359-370, 1961.

Macpherson I. Characteristics of a hamster cell clone transformed by polyoma virus. J. Natl. Cancer Inst. 30: 795-815, 1963.

Deleersnyder V, et al. Formation of native hepatitis C virus glycoprotein complexes. J. Virol. 71: 697-704, 1997. PubMed: 8985401

Yang TT, et al. Quantification of gene expression with a secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter system. BioTechniques 23: 1110-1114, 1997. PubMed: 9421645

Hussain MA, et al. POU domain transcription factor brain 4 confers pancreatic alpha-cell-specific expression of the proglucagon gene through interaction with a novel proximal promoter G1 element. Mol. Cell. Biol. 17: 7186-7194, 1997. PubMed: 9372951

You M, et al. ch-IAp1, a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis protein family, is a mediator of the antiapoptotic activity of the v-Rel oncoprotein. Mol. Cell. Biol. 17: 7328-7341, 1997. PubMed: 9372964

Jelachich ML, Lipton HL. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus kills restrictive but not permissive cells by apoptosis. J. Virol. 70: 6856-6861, 1996. PubMed: 8794327

Schnell MJ, et al. The minimal conserved transcription stop-start signal promotes stable expression of a foreign gene in vesicular stomatitis virus. J. Virol. 70: 2318-2323, 1996. PubMed: 8642658

Chang YE, et al. Properties of the protein encoded by the UL32 open reading frame of herpes simplex virus 1. J. Virol. 70: 3938-3946, 1996. PubMed: 8648731

Biological evaluation of medical devices. Part 5: Tests for in vitro cytotoxicity. Sydney, NSW, Australia:Standards Australia;Standards Australia AS ISO 10993.5-2002.

Biological evaluation of medical devices--Part 5: Tests for in vitro cytotoxicity. Geneva (Switzerland):International Organization for Standardization/ANSI;ISO ISO 10993-5:1999.